Category Archives: Classes

Episode 31: Race As Class

Another day and another episode. Yes, I recorded this yesterday morning and wasn’t quite awake yet. Which makes it a little entertaining in train wreck sort of way.
I go into another of those OSR debates and stand foolishly in the middle. Race as Class is OK but also shouldn’t be the only option and should be cool. Plus I go into a short little ramble on Zoong and maybe an odd idea to mess around with clerics (again). Any here you. Listen. Subscribe. Roll Dice….
Episode 31: Race as Class

White Box House Rules Version 1

Yes, I’m still working/prepping for a White Box (Swords & Wizardry/Fantastic Medieval Adventures) campaign. But if you’ve been around this blog more than one then you know that I just love house rules. So I put together my Version 1 of them. Because I know I’m going to change up some the stuff in there before I start. Ideas will come up and some feedback (Hopefully) will happen. So this is very much a living document.
I’m also hacking the basic classes and putting together my own versions of the “Advanced” classes plus some others that I just think are cool. And since I’m messing with classes I’ll probably do some other races too. And do some versions of the classic spells that are from Supplement 1: Greyhawk. Chances are that will end up as a cheap PDF on RPGNow. It’s been way too long since I’ve published anything but then I’ve said that before. Sigh.
White Box House Rules Ver 1
Like I said. Changes will happen to it. And remember folks. Roll Dice. Have Fun. That’s always a house rule.

Cleric’s With Spell Books?

I did that post last week about stuff I was going to mess around with in White Box (Swords & Wizardry/Fantastic Medieval Adventures type) and an astute reader in Tenkar’s Tavern pointed out something pretty interesting. Something that had totally passed me by. In original White Box D&D, clerics used spell books.
That’s right. It’s right there on page 34 of Volume 1: Men & Magic. “Characters who employ spells are assumed to acquire books containing the spells they can use, one book for each spell level. If a duplicate set of such books is desired the cost will be the same as the initial investment for research…Loss of these books will require replacement at the above expense.”
So note. It doesn’t say Magic-Users. It’s characters who employ spells. There’s only two classes that do that. Magic-Users and Clerics. In the paragraph just above the one I quoted, it talks specifically about Clerics and Magic-Users researching spells to expand their spell list. Additionally, there’s nothing about clerics praying for spells or magic-users memorizing their spells. It does say this, ” The number in each column opposite each applicable character indicates the number of spells of each level that can be used (remembered during any single adventure) by that character…A spell once used may not be reused the same day.” That’s a bit poorly worded but then a lot of stuff in LBB is. There’s another interesting bit. That’s the first sentence in the description of the Clerics. “Clerics gain some of the advantages from of the two other classes (Fighting-Men and Magic-Users)..”
Plus there’s the bit about spell research for clerics with same costs as magic-users. Now I dug out my Holmes and Metzger books. And cleric spells work they way we’ve become accustomed. Hmm. This is all pretty interesting and some good food for thought.

Still Playing Around With White Box

Despite all the stuff that’s distracting me. I’m still planning on a White Box game that will be heavily hacked. So let me do this little rant about the basic (or core) four classes along with some random thoughts on each.
Cleric: What’s really bugged me the most about cleric’s is their spell casting. It never made sense to me that they would pray for the spells they need later on. I’ve always imaged them as praying as they need them. I’m playing with the idea of the spontaneous prayer for spells. It just take one round/spell level. Which limits their abilities during combat but smart use just prior to encounter can save the party’s bacon. Also, there’s something we did way back when. The DM at the time let cleric’s do “God Calls” basically ask for divine intervention at a cost. I’m still brainstorming exactly how I want to do this. I’m bouncing around some ideas using a pair of d20’s and if they match good things happen. But that’s still in buried in the depths of my brain category.
Fighter: Hey, the most common class. And also the pretty much the most boring in the old games. So first, I admit that I never liked the additional attacks based against opponents with less than one HD. Meh. I’m leaning towards the “chop when you drop” sort of thing. Drop an opponent get another attack. I’ve heard rumors on the Internet that it was Dave Arneson’s house rule but that’s just an Internet rumor. I’m also thinking of adding a very simple “fighting style” type thing. Either ranged or melee and giving a +1 to-hit and damage. Not much but enough to keep the plain old fighter the best at fighting.
Magic-User: This is probably, the one that I’m going to mess with the most. First, I’m thinking about using and x in d6 mechanic based on INT for chance to learn spells. Also, to use it for spell research and may be more. Also, magic is just too safe and predictable. I don’t want something as gonzo as DCC but I do want some risk. So every time a magic-user casts a spell there’s a spell-level in d20 chance that something could go horribly wrong. I’m thinking of reducing the chance by use of special spell components or even specific types of magic items. Hey, a wizard’s staff that helps with spell casting.
Thief: So I’ll be using the Thief from White Box Fantastic Medieval Adventure Game from Seattle Hill Games. However, I think I’ll opt for two Thief Skills. The first Thievery for locks, traps, stealth and climbing. The second Skullduggery; for picking pockets, disguise, and general streetwise. So basically, Thievery is mechanical devices and the environment while Skullduggery is the social side of the underworld.
I’ll probably mess around with some additional classes too. I know I’ve talked about keeping to the basic four. But if they actually do get changed up enough, then they are worth the add. I’m also having a running internal debate on nonhuman races. I’ll probably go all crazy Cantina Scene to give the players some extra options but haven’t decided if I should run with Racial Classes or a limited selection of classes and multiclassing. I still have plenty of time to ponder and play around with that. Heck, if all this stuff turns out pretty decent I may throw it up on RPGNow as a cheap little PDF. We shall see.
Plus I need to clean up my House Rules document and redo and clean up the world stuff. So stay tuned for those posts.

Sharp Swords & Sinister Spells Character Sheet V3

Since it was requested Here’s the Version 3 of the character sheet. A few things have been rearranged and I’ve added Sanity.
My Character Sheet V3
And as a bonus here’s some ideas on house rules.
Initiative: I really like the idea of using Hit Dice to determine initiative. I was playing around with a similar idea before I’d even heard of Sharp Swords & Sinister Spells so why not take that old idea and apply it in a new way. Now, I’ve played games with static initiative and while it was easy, generally everybody went in the same order every round and it got kind of boring and predictable. So what to do?
Roll your Hit Die and go in order from highest to lowest roll.
The more combat oriented characters have a better chance of going first but not always.

Blood/Hit Points: I like both so why not use both. Well sort of basically. The minimum uninjured HP that a character has is equal to their Physique. When the character gains a level and they could potentially roll (with all their Hit Dice) more than their Physique then roll the dice. If the total is less then nothing changes. If the total is more then that’s the characters new total HP and when the character gains their next level just roll an additional Hit Die as normal.

There’s more ideas bouncing around my head but that’s for later when they start making sense to me.

Finally Did My Character Sheet for Sharp Swords

Still working on all the bells and whistles I want to prepare for Sharp Swords and Sinister Spells. Today’s little project my own little character sheet. Since the rules are pretty lite there aren’t that many differences. The one thing I did want to add is a Luck Track plus this serves as a little cheat sheet for the die chain. I know it’s pretty simple but but some folks find that extra little bit of reference handy. Enjoy.
My Character Sheet

The Cultist for Sharp Swords and Sinister Spells

I said I had another class in mind a couple of weeks ago and well here it is along with a bonus class. OK, so your first questions is why?
Well I wanted something with a slightly different vibe than the magic-user but didn’t exactly want a replacement cleric. So enter the Cultist (which fits the whole Sword & Sorcery vibe). The magic-user seeks out knowledge and bends the universe to his will. The cultist seeks out arcane power for gain. Like a cleric, The Cultist can change spells giving them more flexibility. But that power is at the whim of whatever elder god that the Cultist has taken a liking to. And that power can be pulled away at any time and the character is going to have to do something (probably something bad) to get it back.
As a bonus, I had a quick bit of inspiration and threw together a Barbarian too. Yeah, I know there’s the Warrior. But I wanted something again with a different feel than the core class. I fully admit these are both in the bleeding beta stage. I may revision or even throw to them side when I finally get around to running a game. But in the mean time here you go. Cultist and Barbarian
Til next time. Roll Dice. Have Fun!